This Is It | S7 E33: NBA Free Agency… Weak or Powerful? (Part 2)

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In Part 2, Strafe, Ali, Cousin D and Alvin Grimes discuss how good the Warriors can be next season, why general managers are encouraged to make “super teams” while players are not (19:05 mark) and how LeBron James can finish his career being regarded as better than Michael Jordan (37:30).

This Is It | 6.19.13: One Free Throw Away

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After an epic Game 6 of the NBA Finals, we get on the jack to discuss…

  • @MidtownMo‘s all-day whining about “trolling”  and dealing with fans that want you to love their team all the time 
  • Who gets the credit for the Heat win… or the blame for the Spurs loss (@StreetzTalk tries to place blame on one particular Argentinian) (8:25 mark)
  •  What would happen to LeBron if the Heat lost Game 7 of the NBA Finals at home (14:15)
  • If the best team always wins in a seven-game series (case in point: Orlando vs. Cleveland in the 2009 East Finals) (21:25)
  • More slander for @MidtownMo, including his grouping the Knicks & Lakers fans into one “united front” (32:00)
  • If LeBron will wear a headband for Game 7, and when it’s time to tell your friend to accept his male-pattern baldness (39:24)
  • Predictions for Game 7 (44:55)
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The Heat Dilemma

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Good morning, Heat fan (or supporter or bandwagon jumper or whatever you fancy yourself).

Chances are, you’re not in the best of moods this morning, which is semi-understandable. It’s understandable because you just watched your Heat get run out of the gym last night in San Antonio. However, it’s only semi-understandable because the anguish you feel today is only partially the fault of LeBron, Wade, Bosh, Coach Spo, etc.

The rest of the blame lies squarely on your shoulders, for these two reasons:

  1. You never, ever, EVER expect the Miami Heat to lose a game. Ever.
  2. You pick every single playoff series for the Heat in five games or less. Maybe six games, but only if their opponent is really, really good.

“Come on, now!” you retort. “That’s my team! I’m a die-hard fan! What type of fan would I be if I ever thought they would lose?”

That’s simple. A realistic one.

I will grant you this, Heat fan: You’re not entirely at fault for this line of thinking. When LeBron James, the most talented player in the NBA, declared that the Heat would win “not two, not three, not four” championships at a victory celebration before the season started , fans are going to get hyped.

However, you are at fault for running like hell with that statement.

I will give you the benefit of the doubt that you didn’t think the 2010-11 Heat would go 82-0.  Yet, if I asked you before every Heat game that season if the Heat would win – no matter who the opponent – never would these words be uttered:

I could see us losing this game.

Not against the Bulls. Not against the Pacers. Not against the Knicks. Not against the Celtics. Not against the Grizzlies, Lakers, Thunder, Spurs, Mavericks… not against anyone.

No other fan base (as a whole) is this hard-headed about their team. Sure, you’ll find the group of Knicks fans who think Melo can lead them to a title (morons), or the group of Lakers fans who thought the Lakers could have beat the Spurs in Round 1, with or without Kobe (God, how silly do they look?).

But as a whole, Heat Nation views Heat basketball like this: when the Heat win, they were always supposed to win, it was never in doubt, because that’s what the Heat do.  And when the Heat lose, it’s, “Now we’re mad! We’ll win the next game by double digits! Book it!”

And up-and-down the see-saw has gone for the past three seasons.

Again, I  (somewhat) understand this mentality, especially in the 2010-11 season, when the guy who won 66 games with these guys joined a team with the guy who was the 2006 Finals MVP for charging into the lane with reckless abandon and getting foul calls at the drop of a dime averaging 35 points a game. However, one would think that the “catastrophe” of  the 2011 NBA Finals would temper these thoughts a bit.

Oh, you’ve forgotten the 2011 NBA Finals? Not to worry, here’s a quick synopsis:

  • The Heat lost Game 2 after blowing a 15-point in the second half… of the fourth quarter
  • The Heat lost Game 4 after being up nine with 10 minutes left in the fourth quarter
  • The Heat lost the series in Game 6, a game in which Dallas’ Dirk Nowitzki was 1-for-12 in the first half and shot 9-for-27 for the game
  • The Heat became the first team under the 2-3-2 format to win Game 3 of the NBA Finals and lose the series

Did this mean that the Heat were doomed forever more? Of course not. However, it should have served as a reminder that the Miami Heat, no matter how good they’ve ever looked (including when they’re steamrolling the Bucks), were never a mortal lock to win anything.

Then again, if you ask my good friend Midtown Mo about that 2011 NBA Finals, he has the same retort to this day.

“It shoulda been a sweep!”

Not for Dallas. For Miami.

Such is The Heat Dilemma.

This Is It | 6.12.13: Chad Johnson Doesn’t Get It

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@WilliamHStrafe, @MidtownMo, @DrJayJack & @MrGetItOnJones discuss whether Chad Johnson’s butt-slap deserved jail time, if Tim Tebow will play a meaningful snap in 2013 and Serena Williams’ place among the all-time greats.

I guarantee this podcast will last less than 30 minutes or your money back!

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